November 2012 Blog Posts

Cynefin exercise about Agile software development - 4 Our exercise

This post is the 4th of the series co-authored with Michael Podvinec where we write about the exercise and some of the insights gained: 1 - Intro 2 - Sense-Making 3 - Categorization 4 - Our exercise 5 - Key learnings Michael is a molecular biologist by training, and is convinced that agile methods have a place in all domains where we're commonly dealing with complexity and uncertainty, such as biomedical research.  He really promises he will soon publish more regularly on topics like these on his blog. Until then,...

Cynefin exercise about Agile software development - 3 Categorization

This post is the third of the series co-authored with Michael Podvinec where we write about the exercise and some of the insights gained: 1 - Intro 2 - Sense-Making 3 - Categorization 4 - Our exercise 5 - Key learnings Michael is a molecular biologist by training, and is convinced that agile methods have a place in all domains where we're commonly dealing with complexity and uncertainty, such as biomedical research.  He really promises he will soon publish more regularly on topics like these on his blog. Until then, he suggests you to...

Cynefin exercise about Agile software development - 2 Sense-Making

This post is the second of the series co-authored with Michael Podvinec where we write about the exercise and some of the insights gained: 1 - Intro 2 - Sense-Making 3 - Categorization 4 - Our exercise 5 - Key learnings Michael is a molecular biologist by training, and is convinced that agile methods have a place in all domains where we're commonly dealing with complexity and uncertainty, such as biomedical research.  He really promises he will soon publish more regularly on topics like these on his blog. Until then,...

Does the nature of a problem constrain the possible transitions between Cynefin domains?

This is the tweet stream of the conversation. We know that the Cynefin framework helps to deal with a seemingly complex problem, define different domains and help to find in what domain a problem belong. Finally for each domain the framework identify the appropriate decision models and approaches. We also know that Agile practices, and other interventions suggested for each domain, move things between domains possibly causing a transition from one Cynefin domain to another one. Indeed Cynefin is also about the dynamics between domains. Q1 - I wonder if the nature or the structure of a problem (or a system)...

Cynefin exercise about Agile software development - 1 Intro

I recently took part in a community exercise to examine the practices in Agile software development using the Cynefin framework as a categorization instrument. This post is the first of a series co-authored with Michael Podvinec where we will write about the exercise and some of the insights gained: 1 - Intro 2 - Sense-Making 3 - Categorization 4 - Our exercise 5 - Key learnings Michael is a molecular biologist by training, and is convinced that agile methods have a place in all domains where we're commonly dealing with complexity and uncertainty, such...